Leftover Roasted Chicken Broth

Bone broths and stocks have been used for centuries as both a mealtime staple and a nourishing powerhouse. Making bone broth helped our ancestors ensure that no part of a hard-earned meal went to waste. Bones, marrow, tendons, ligaments, even the feet of the animal were boiled then simmered over a period of days to make broths.

The extended simmering allows collagen, proline, glycine, gelatin, and glutamine (all of which are stored within the inedible parts) to be released into the delicious, healing bone broth. Bone broths are also a great source of necessary minerals such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur, chondroitin, and glucosamine. Regular consumption of bone broth can be incredibly beneficial to IBS patients. Bone broth is valuable for your gut because of the easily digestible gelatin present. Your body uses gelatin and collagen to replenish the strength of your gut lining and fight food sensitivities. It also helps your gut grow good bacteria and supports healthy levels of inflammation within your digestive tract. Additionally, bone broth and stock is very easy to digest and the nutrients found within it are highly bioavailable. That means they are easy to absorb and be put to use by your body. Having a healthy intestinal lining will reduce permeability and help enhance your digestive system.

In general, store-bought broths and stocks do not have the same nourishing and supportive properties. This is due to the fact that most manufactured stocks and broths are made using bouillon cubes and artificial meat flavors. If you want the nutrition and support of REAL bone broth, your best bet is to make your own. My favorite recipe for bone broth is adapted from The Nourished Kitchen:

Leftover Roasted Chicken Broth

Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 24 mins
Yields: 1 large pot

Ingredients

  • 1 Chicken carcass. organic is better
  • Vegetables or vegetable scraps such as celery, onion, carrot, garlic, etc.
  • Bay Leaves
  • 1 TBSP Apple Cider Vinegar (I use Braggs)

Directions

  1. Add the chicken carcass, vegetables, and bay leaves to a large crockpot
  2. Pour filtered water over the carcass until covered
  3. Add the apple cider vinegar
  4. Cook over low heat for at least 24 hours, adding water to keep the carcass covered as necessary. You know your bone broth is done when the bones are flexible and rubbery
  5. Strain the bone broth through a fine mesh sieve and then store in glass

Additional Info

Fresh broth can be stored in a refrigerator up to 1 week. Frozen broth will keep for 6 months.

Erica Zellner

Erica is an Experienced Nutritionist with a demonstrated history of working in the health wellness and fitness industry. Skilled in Motivational Interviewing, Chronic Illness, Clinical Nutrition, Chronic Fatigue, and Health Education. She is a strong healthcare services professional with a Master of Science (M.S.) focused in Nutrition and Integrative Health from Maryland University of Integrative Health.

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